Geometric Representations of Quantum Theory

with Bryan Roberts, in preparation


Comparing Dualities and Gauge Transformations

with Jeremy Butterfield and Sebastian de Haro, in submission


On the Relation between Dualities and Gauge Transformations

with Jeremy Butterfield and Sebastian de Haro

Forthcoming in Proceedings of the 2015 PSA Conference


Theoretical Equivalence in Classical Mechanics and its Relationship to Duality

with Dimitris Tsementzis

Forthcoming in SHPMP Special Issue on Dualities, E. Castellani and D. Rickles (Eds.)


Galileo's Gauge: Understanding the Empirical Significance of Gauge Symmetry

 

Philosophy of Science Vol. 83, No. 1 (January 2016), pp. 93-118

PhilSci

Some Remarks on Rovelli's "Why Gauge?"

 

European Journal of the Philosophy of Science, 5 (3):339-348, October 2015

PhilSci

Categorical Generalization and Physical Structuralism

with Raymond Lal

British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, July 25 2015 (online)

PhilSci
 

Relational Realism: A New Foundation for Quantum Mechanics?

 

Book Review in Metascience 24 (2):205-209 (2015) 


Gravity and Gauge

 

British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Dec 8 2014 (online)

PhilSci

Holography and Emergence

 

Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: SHPMP 44 (3): 300-311 (2013) 

PhilSci

Anscombe on Non-reductionistic Accounts of Human Action

 

in Willing the Good (ed. De Anna), Cambridge Scholars Publishing 2012


Classical Cloning and No-cloning

 

Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: SHPMP 43 (1): 47-63 (2012) 

PhilSci

 

Dissertation

Title: On Topological Objects in Field Theory

Supervisor: Dr Jeremy Butterfield

Examiners: Prof. Harvey Brown, Dr David Wallace

My dissertation is an attempt to understand the philosophy and the foundations of the topological soliton concept in modern field theory. Part I provides a conceptual history of the tension between the particle/field dualism in Victorian physics, and how topological concepts (including the idea of topological particles) naturally grew out of early attempts to formulate hydrodynamics and electromagnetism. Part II is a review of modern classical field theory, focusing on the different roles played by topology and symmetry, especially in classifying different types of field-theoretic objects. Finally, Part III is an introduction to the foundations of modern topological solitons (especially monopoles) and provides a critical analysis of how one should interpret the monopole moduli space, i.e. how one should individuate static monopole solutions. In particular, I argue that an ambiguity in the standard interpretation can make it seem (falsely) to be inconsistent with the gauge-invariance of solutions, and proceed to disambiguate this interpretation. I conclude the dissertation with a brief discussion of the philosophical implications (of a very basic case) of S-duality. I am working on turning this into a monograph, but e-mail me if you would like a copy.